Posts tagged entrepreneurship
Push an Inch or Push a Mile. Your Call

Do you ever wonder why you are working so hard and soooo busy but just aren’t changing the game in your life or business. The truth is that most of us are trying to push too many things forward and we end up pushing them an inch. Focus and prioritization can move initiatives forward a mile but we’re scare of “giving up” on the other activities. You much give up some things to progress in others. Focus on pushing your intention a mile and see the results.

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Changing Your Trajectory. It's Just Physics.

This post is about life trajectories and how to change them. I was inspired by a former business coach, Lex Sisney, who talked about achieving life and business goals through the lens of physics. That got me thinking about the variables that drive trajectories and how those can be changed (or at least having the intention to change.)

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Create Your Organization's Learning Advantage

We have to create the ripples and the ripples may turn into a wave and a wave may turn into a rapid and propel us down the river.  If we aren't creating ripples often then there is no chance for a rapid to emerge.  This is one example of acknowledging some truths in building velocity at your organization, the ability to move decisively to get a learning advantage.

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The Softer Side of the Entrepreneur/VC Relationship

I was a venture capital investor for about five years prior to starting my first healthcare company.  It gave me the opportunity, while I was still pretty young in my career, to learn the process of sourcing, investing in, and then owning an interest in a highly volatile start-up company. I had a mentor who said to me once, “You don’t know what you invested in until you get to the first board meeting”.  He also said, “The easiest thing you’ll ever do in this business is write the check”.  The point is that the work of the venture capitalist begins once they are an owner. 

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Leading at the Right Altitude

I recently finished leading a strategic planning process for a non-profit in Seattle.  It was an incredible opportunity to work with the Board and the community to set the course for the next three years.  But the process also exposed an area of risk for both the Board and senior leadership.  The risk was one of altitude.  Boards fly at one level.  Executive leadership at another.  Staff at another.  Knowing your altitude often determines the trajectory toward the destination. 

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Cash is King

In 1996 I nervously approached Day 1 of investment banking in New York.  The training program would last about a month and we were all bright eyed, anxious, committed, and less than humble.  Frankly I couldn't even believe I landed the job (a different post for a different time) but I was ready.  The trainer for the program was a guy who made such an incredible impression on me.  His name was Paul Kushel, but he went by "Cash" and he managed to make even the most mundane accounting topics crazy fun and exciting (I know, I have issues).  You can read about how he got the name Cash here but it wasn't because his wife's name was Flo (that's run of the mill accounting humor).  Cash left a big impression on me and an impression I want to leave on you.  When it comes to business:  CASH IS KING.  Know it.  Love it.  Lean into it.

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Release the Pressure Valve Gradually

Entrepreneurship is a little like pressure building up in the Instapot you bought over the holidays.  There is so much energy inside of the vessel that it feels like it’s going to explode.  I was reading about Instapot horror stories online where people accidentally (or out of curiosity) flipped the release valve, only to have tonight’s soup spraying on the kitchen ceilings and walls.   I have felt like that guy many times over the years. That might be you too. 

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"With Great Power Comes Great Responsibility" -- Uncle Ben

I'm running home from a beautiful trail run at Tiger Mountain this morning, feeling strong.  I had the intention when I went out that I would move for 2 hours, 30 minutes and not stop on the climbs.  I ended the run and I felt powerful, accomplished, and grateful.  On the drive home I turned on my local NPR station and listened to Dalcher Keltner being interviewed about his book, The Power Paradox.  It got me thinking about power as a leader.

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